Slacking

Obviously, I haven’t been on here as often as I would like to be for the past couple of weeks or so. I’d love to say it’s because I’ve been editing Collecting Humanity or working on some other sort of writing project, but no such luck.

9788867323135_350I did do a tiny bit of editing last night and I have been keeping up with my planner/journal every day. I’ve also been trying to write at least one or two poems every week. I know that isn’t going to get me my poem a day goal, but it’s progress compared to last year.

It’s as if I haven’t been able to get really plugged in lately.

But maybe it’s more that I’ve been too plugged into some things instead of what I should be. Besides my writing and brief bouts of social media, I should probably try to stay off of the internet. It wouldn’t be a bad idea for me to uninstall or at least move my Facebook app that I have on my phone either.

Something else that I would consider an achievement so far is that I’ve been reading more. I used to read all of the time, but I stopped that at some point last year or the year before for some reason. I’m currently working on David Baldacci’s Saving Faith that a patient, where I work, actually let me borrow. And, before that, I read Horns by Joe Hill; I haven’t watched the movie yet, but a friend of mine said that he liked it.

But I haven’t been blogging as regularly as I’d like and I haven’t been editing my novel in a way that will help me to finish it. My husband actually told me last night that he was happy I was working on it, that he would make me sit down and work on it if he could.

I’m planning on setting aside at least one night a week to focus solely on tackling the beastly project that is editing. And I’m going to try to post at least twice a week here and on No Penny Required.

Writing as an Adventure

Writing a book is an adventure. To being with, it is a toy and an amusement; then it becomes a mistress, and then it becomes a master, and then a tyrant. The last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster, and fling him out to the public.

Winston Churchill

Frank, Leonard Roy. Random House Webster’s Quotationary. New York: Random House, 1999. Print.

Citations

I know, I can’t bring another Story Piece today, but I can find time to give you two posts in one day instead? We already knew that I was strange.

I recently realized that I haven’t been citing from the book that I’ve been using to find quotes from. And, because I think it’s important for you to use citations in work, it must also be important for me to use citations in my work. This posts is simply giving you a head up that whenever you see some words in magenta at the end of one of my posts, that is a citation from Son of Citation Machine.

ExampleofMagentaCitation

Above is a better example of the magenta that will be happening. I know that it looks pink, but if you have a WordPress account, you can look at your color options and this one is, in fact, known as magenta.

Anyways, I’m going to go through the other few Weekly Quotes that I have and make sure that I have MLA citations for each of them.

QuotationaryThe book that I was referring to is the Quotationary put together by Leonard Roy Frank. This is a wonderful book that I’m pretty sure my grandma found for me somewhere at some point some years ago–it’s been a while. It’s also a book that I think you should make a part of your collection because it is wonderful and also because it is apparently only $0.98 on Amazon.

I’ve always found quotes to be fun to look at it and they can also be an inspiration for your writing. I find that it’s a great way to spark poetry, in particular.

And this book is designed wonderfully. For one thing, it’s huge! It’s filled to the brim with so many wonderfully easy to read and find quotes.

Frank did a great job when he decided to separate the quotes by subject, making it easy to flip through your ABCs until you find the type of quote you might be looking for. The index is also broken up into topic and author, making it even easier to find what you’re looking for. Each quote has the speaker of said quote along with what they might have said it in, be it a novel or speech or letter. There are even some classic, anonymous quotes at the end of each section.

New Things

New Posts

In my last post, I mentioned a new serial post that I was seriously considering starting. Well, I’m trying to make that happen.

Starting this Friday, you’re going to get scenes from a work of fiction that I literally just started working on.

Since I’m going to be posting them pretty much as I write them each week (on Fridays), there’s going to be minimal editing, so there’s a chance that the flow might be off or that I might forget Bob’s name in one scene and change it to Fred. But, really, who could possibly forget about Bob?

I would love to tell you all about the story, give you a little teaser to make you want to read it, but all I know so far is that it’s about some fairies and a young woman who didn’t know that she could talk to them or that they even existed.

I’m thinking about calling these weekly posts Story Pieces and there will, of course, be a page that helps you to keep track of them. Until I come up with proper titles, the stories will be referred to as things like “Bob’s story” or “The Fairies”. On the page, I’ll have the scenes links to each scene in the proper order. This means that, if I somehow manage to write some scenes out of order, they will be in the correct order on this page.

Pages

Speaking of pages, I very much need to edit these. Besides pages that don’t quite make sense to me anymore, there are things that need to be updated and a picture that’s no longer available and…it’s simply a work in progress.

I’ve already taken down the “What I’m Reading” page. This is because I don’t update it regularly enough. Also, I have the GoodReads widget installed and I seem to update that more frequently than the page I had set up here. It isn’t a perfect list, but the fact that I can update it on my phone seems to make it more likely that I will, in fact, update it at all.

If you would like to find me on GoodReads, my name there is Seannalyn.

Widgets

Now that I think of it, the widgets need to be edited too.

There’s going to be some deleting, rewording, rearranging, and possibly the addition of new widgets if any look applicable. So, consider this a work in progress as well.

The part that talks about when IBW is updated needs to be changed after some consideration, and I failed my personal poem a day challenge. I’m not going to be able to create 300 something poems in the past three weeks or so of the year. Although, I might try to do that again in 2015, hopefully with better luck.

Site Specific

As you may remember from earlier this year, I decided to splurge and buy a bundle off of WordPress. I bought the Premium Plan.

WordPress_Bundles

As you can see, this includes, among other things, a free domain name and that’s the main reason that I bought it. I’m fairly certain that I didn’t use any of the other features besides enjoying the lack of ads here. That, paired with the fact that it costs $99 every year, caused me to cancel the bundle.

When I canceled the bundle, a break down of all of these features that I had purchased, along with their individual prices appeared. I’m still trying to figure out whether or not I want to spend $30 a year for the domain name.

So, we may or may not be returning to http://www.ibreathewords.wordpress.com and you will start seeing ads on this site again starting in early January. I am sorry about the later and will get back to you about the whole reason that I went premium in the first place.

Surround Yourself

I’ve steadily come to the realization that I’m currently reading and watching fiction that’s similar to the mood of my main writing project.

Last week, I finished the first draft of a short story that I’ve been working, which is on a much lighter note than the novel I started in November. Shortly after, I finished reading “The Gunslinger: The Dark Tower I” by Stephen King and then picked up Dan Brown‘s “Angels & Demons” off my shelf. I also became invested in the TV show The Following.

43615All three of these stories, if you will, are rather dark in nature. I’ve written a review of The Following, but have yet to do so for “The Gunslinger.” And, since I’ve barely started “Angels & Demons,” of course I haven’t written a review for Brown’s work yet. Check out their websites or do some Google-ing of your own, but the point that I’m trying to make is that each of these works can, in some way, be classified in the horror genre.

I can’t stand horror or slasher movies, but I enjoy reading the same genre in book form. (Yes, I’m aware that I’m strange). And I can handle TV shows that freak me out as long as there’s enough plot to pull me in and I have something to distract me before bedtime.

So, if horror isn’t my favorite thing to read or watch, why do I suddenly find myself surrounded by it?

I think it was subconscious’ way of telling me to get back into writing my novel. And yesterday I did start the next chapter of what is already the longest work I’ve ever written. Whether or not King and Brown and Kevin Bacon inspired me to get back to it, I think that it’s benefiting me to immerse myself in this world.

To me, it’s important for every writer to devote as much time as possible to 1) writing and 2) reading. How best do we learn our craft than by practicing it and observing the success of other master crafters? And, especially if you find your self delving into a topic you aren’t used to writing, I think that it’s a good idea to read and watch works that are at least somewhat similar to what you’re working on. I’m not telling you to plagiarize. All I’m trying to say is that it might get you in the right mindset or mood for what you’re working on.

“Who Am I”

In one of the scenes in” The Amazing Spider Man“, we find Peter Parker and Gwen in class with the teacher discussing plot. She tells her students that someone once said there were only 10 different types of plots, but she disagreed. In her opinion, there was only one plot line–who am I?

What do you think? Consider all of the works you’ve seen or read and all of those that you’ve created. Do any or all of them answer, or seek to answer, the question “who am I”?

who-am-i_nametagI don’t know if it’s true for every work of the world that’s ever been or will be written, but I think there’s  a possibility that it could be.

If I think of all the works of fiction that I’ve written and am working on, you could easily say that each of the main characters are, in some way, on a quest to discover themselves. And isn’t that essentially what we, as people, are trying to to with our lives? Aren’t we all trying to figure out who we are and and we’ve been put here?

Take Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling, fir example. From the first day that we meet Harry, he’s trying to find himself. If you haven’t read these books, then

  1. you must read them–now. Go!
  2. I’ll explain what I’m talking about. The first time that we meet Harry, he’s living (if you can call it that) with his aunt, uncle, and cousin–all of whom hate him. Naturally, a boy of almost 10, who finds himself in this particular situation, does a lot of questioning why he’s in these circumstances along with wishing that his parents hadn’t left him to this part of their family. Then, one day, a letter comes in the mail addressed to Harry. Though they won’t admit, his aunt and uncle know exactly what this means and burn the letter and the subsequent letters that follow until (in ways that you’ll have to find out by reading the books), Harry finally gets to read one of the letters. He finds out that he’s a wizard. But this doesn’t exactly answer his “who am I” question, it just open a whole new box of questions.

Another example is Disney’s Frozen. Both of the main characters–Anna and Elsa–spend the movie trying to figure out who they are. If you haven’t seen this movie,

  1. go watch it now!
  2. read the review that I wrote of it so you can get a better grasp of what I’m talking about.

My last example is the TV show, The Blacklist. Throughout the show, the main character, Liz Keen, just wants to know who she is. It seems that she can’t pin down her past or even the true identities of the people around her. Again, if you’ve never seen this show,

  1. this is definitely a crime show worth getting in to. Go see it!
  2. I’ve written a review of this one as well.

All three of these are good examples of the plot line “who am I”. Tell me, what do you think of all this? Agree? Disagree? Examples of why for either response?

Stephen King

Partly because I haven’t started reading this book yet, and partly because I love beginnings of novels, here are some words from the beginning of Stephen King’s novel The Gunslinger: The Dark Tower I. I have yet to read anything by King and I’ve been intrigued by him for a while now, so I thought it was about time to delve into his work.

The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

~Stephen King

Are you interested in this story? I am. Who are the man in black and the gunslinger? Why is the gunslinger chasing him? And why are they in the desert? I don’t know about you, but I’m going to go read now.

King, Stephen. The Gunslinger. New York, NY: New American Library, 1988. Print.