Writing as an Adventure

Writing a book is an adventure. To being with, it is a toy and an amusement; then it becomes a mistress, and then it becomes a master, and then a tyrant. The last phase is that just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster, and fling him out to the public.

Winston Churchill

Frank, Leonard Roy. Random House Webster’s Quotationary. New York: Random House, 1999. Print.

My Apologies

My intent with the Story Pieces series that I started was to give you something every Friday, but I don’t have anything new to give you today. For those of you looking forward to the next installment, I’m very sorry. You will get more Gwen and more fairies next Friday in the new year. And I’m planning on writing even more to make up for it.

Yesterday was Christmas and I had the joy of cooking a meal for my husband, our moms, and my grandma. It was our first Christmas as a married couple and I know that I loved all of it.

I hope that, for those of you who celebrate Christmas, that you had a wonderful time enjoying the people that you love. For those of you who don’t, I hope that you had a wonderful time celebrating your own holidays and traditions. To all of you, today and every day, celebrate whatever time you’re given with the people you love. We don’t know the length of time we’ve been given here.

When I give I give myself.

~Walt Whitman, from Song of Myself

Frank, Leonard Roy. Random House Webster’s Quotationary. New York: Random House, 1999. Print.

Lord Chesterfield

Take care of the minutes, for the hours will take care of themselves.

I feel like this quote by Lord Chesterfield, a man who was born in 1694, really applies to what I’ve been talking about these past couple of weeks. I’ve always had a bit of a problem with time management, and focusing on what I’m going to do for a couple of minutes instead of the stretching hours, days, years ahead makes it much easier to focus and get things done.

This is something that I learned during NaNoWriMo because of my success in focusing on the 1,667 words every day instead of the 50,000 words that I ultimately had to have written.

Frank, Leonard Roy. Random House Webster’s Quotationary. New York: Random House, 1999. Print.

Stephen King

Partly because I haven’t started reading this book yet, and partly because I love beginnings of novels, here are some words from the beginning of Stephen King’s novel The Gunslinger: The Dark Tower I. I have yet to read anything by King and I’ve been intrigued by him for a while now, so I thought it was about time to delve into his work.

The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.

~Stephen King

Are you interested in this story? I am. Who are the man in black and the gunslinger? Why is the gunslinger chasing him? And why are they in the desert? I don’t know about you, but I’m going to go read now.

King, Stephen. The Gunslinger. New York, NY: New American Library, 1988. Print.

Pirates

Squire Trelawney, Dr. Livesay, and the rest of these gentlemen having asked me to write down the whole particulars about Treasure Island, from the beginning to the end, keeping nothing back but the bearings of the island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I take up my pen in the year of grace 17…and go back to the time when my father kept the Admiral Benbow inn and the brown old seaman with the sabre cut first took up his lodging under our roof.

~Robert Louis Stevenson from “Treasure Island”

As I mentioned in today’s other post, I’m going to try to start reading Treasure Island. Partly because I have a thing for first lines and partly because I haven’t had the chance to start reading this work, I’ve given you the first sentence of the novel.

Stevenson, Robert Louis. Treasure Island. Oxford: Macmillan, 2005. Print.